Acenaphthene in the tap water

You may have recently heard about acenaphthene in the news. This organic compound has been found in trace amounts in tap water in some areas across the country. While the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has not yet issued any regulations regarding this compound, some health experts are concerned about its potential health effects. Here's what you need to know about acenaphthene in tap water.


What is Acenaphthene?

Acenaphthene is a yellowish-white crystalline solid with a sweet, musty odor. It is used as a fuel oil additive and as a polymerization inhibitor for plastics production. Acenaphthene can be found naturally occurring in crude oil and coal tar. It can also be released into the environment from the burning of fossil fuels, as well as from certain industrial processes such as aluminum smelting.


While acenaphthene is not currently regulated by the EPA, some health experts are concerned about its potential health effects. Studies on animals have shown that acenaphthene can cause liver and kidney damage, as well as nervous system effects such as tremors and seizures. There is also some evidence that acenaphthene may be carcinogenic in humans. However, more research is needed to confirm these potential health effects in humans.


Should I Be Concerned About Acenaphthene in Tap Water?

At this time, there is no reason to be overly concerned about trace amounts of acenaphthene in tap water. The EPA has not issued any regulations regarding this compound, and it is present in such small amounts that it is unlikely to pose a significant health risk. However, if you are concerned about your exposure to this compound, you can take steps to reduce your exposure by using a home water filtration system or avoiding drinking tap water altogether.


Acenaphthene is a yellowish-white crystalline solid with a sweet, musty odor. It is used as a fuel oil additive and as a polymerization inhibitor for plastics production. Acenaphthene can be found naturally occurring in crude oil and coal tar. It can also be released into the environment from the burning of fossil fuels, as well as from certain industrial processes such as aluminum smelting.At this time, there is no reason to be overly concerned about trace amounts of acenaphthene in tap water. The EPA has not issued any regulations regarding this compound, and it is present in such small amounts that it is unlikely to pose a significant health risk. However, if you are concerned about your exposure to this compound, you can take steps to reduce your exposure by using a home water filtration system or avoiding drinking tap water altogether.